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dc.date.accessioned2021-12-10T12:07:42Z
dc.date.available2021-12-10T12:07:42Z
dc.date.created2021-11-04T15:53:42Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationAndersen, Tor Kristian Bodin, Johanna Eva Oftung, Fredrik Bogen, Bjarne Mjaaland, Siri Grødeland, Gunnveig . Pandemic Preparedness Against Influenza: DNA Vaccine for Rapid Relief. Frontiers in Immunology. 2021, 12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/89454
dc.description.abstractThe 2009 “swine flu” pandemic outbreak demonstrated the limiting capacity for egg-based vaccines with respect to global vaccine supply within a timely fashion. New vaccine platforms that efficiently can quench pandemic influenza emergences are urgently needed. Since 2009, there has been a profound development of new vaccine platform technologies with respect to prophylactic use in the population, including DNA vaccines. These vaccines are particularly well suited for global pandemic responses as the DNA format is temperature stable and the production process is cheap and rapid. Here, we show that by targeting influenza antigens directly to antigen presenting cells (APC), DNA vaccine efficacy equals that of conventional technologies. A single dose of naked DNA encoding hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza/A/California/2009 (H1N1), linked to a targeting moiety directing the vaccine to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules, raised similar humoral immune responses as the adjuvanted split virion vaccine Pandemrix, widely administered in the 2009 pandemic. Both vaccine formats rapidly induced serum antibodies that could protect mice already 8 days after a single immunization, in contrast to the slower kinetics of a seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Importantly, the DNA vaccine also elicited cytotoxic T-cell responses that reduced morbidity after vaccination, in contrast to very limited T-cell responses seen after immunization with Pandemrix and TIV. These data demonstrate that DNA vaccines has the potential as a single dose platform vaccine, with rapid protective effects without the need for adjuvant, and confirms the relevance of naked DNA vaccines as candidates for pandemic preparedness.
dc.languageEN
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titlePandemic Preparedness Against Influenza: DNA Vaccine for Rapid Relief
dc.typeJournal article
dc.creator.authorAndersen, Tor Kristian
dc.creator.authorBodin, Johanna Eva
dc.creator.authorOftung, Fredrik
dc.creator.authorBogen, Bjarne
dc.creator.authorMjaaland, Siri
dc.creator.authorGrødeland, Gunnveig
cristin.unitcode185,53,18,12
cristin.unitnameAvdeling for immunologi og transfusjonsmedisin
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.cristin1951515
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Frontiers in Immunology&rft.volume=12&rft.spage=&rft.date=2021
dc.identifier.jtitleFrontiers in Immunology
dc.identifier.volume12
dc.identifier.pagecount14
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.747032
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-92056
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn1664-3224
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/89454/1/Andersen_2021_Pan.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid74732
dc.relation.projectNFR/-
dc.relation.projectHSØ/-


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