Now showing items 1-16 of 16

  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    All the Scandinavian languages have overt non-referential subjects in e.g. impersonal or existential constructions and with weather-verbs like rain. It is, however, well known that the properties of the non-referential ...
  • Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2015)
    This paper investigates aspects of the noun phrase from a Scandinavian heritage language perspective, with an emphasis on noun phrase-internal gender agreement and noun declension. Our results are somewhat surprising ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    A conditional sentence consists of two parts: a condition and a consequent. The consequent is realized as a matrix clause, and the condition is realized as a subordinate clause (as part of the matrix consequent). In the ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    Unlike English, the Mainland Scandinavian languages have a complementizer som in embedded questions with a subject gap; see the Swedish example in (1a) (and cf. Teleman et al. 1999/4: 555 ff.). This is sometimes referred ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    In many Nordic varieties, a perfect participle or supine form occurs in the complement of a verb which otherwise takes an infinitive, as in (1) below (see e.g. Thráinsson et al. 2004: 234–236).[1] This is typically only ...
  • Larsson, Ida; Johannessen, Janne Bondi (Chapter / Bokkapittel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2015)
    This paper investigates the word order in embedded clauses in Heritage Scandinavian (American Norwegian and American Swedish). It is shown that Heritage Scandinavian has a substantial amount of verb-raising across negation ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    Passives with expletive subjects seem to be possible in all Nordic dialects, but there is variation with respect to the choice of expletive subject, order between participle and object DP and agreement, as well as with ...
  • Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Salmons, Joseph C.; Westergaard, Marit; Anderssen, Merete; Arnbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Allen, Brent; Pierce, Marc; Boas, Hans C.; Roesch, Karen; Brown, Joshua R.; Putnam, Michael; Åfarli, Tor A.; Newman, Zelda Kahan; Annear, Lucas; Speth, Kristin; Benor, Sarah Bunin; Ehresmann, Todd; Bousquette, Joshua; Eide, Kristin Melum; Hjelde, Arnstein; Laake, Signe; Golden, Anne; Lanza, Elizabeth; Larsson, Ida; Tingsell, Sofia; Andréasson, Maia; Smits, Caroline; van Marle, Jaap (Book / Bok / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2015)
    This book presents new empirical findings about Germanic heritage varieties spoken in North America: Dutch, German, Pennsylvania Dutch, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, West Frisian and Yiddish, and varieties of English ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    The Nordic languages have non-canonical passive constructions with GET + past participle, as in the Swedish examples in (1).[1] These examples have in common that the subject of GET is not (necessarily) interpreted as the ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    Among the present-day Scandinavian languages, only Danish and possibly Faroese have a split auxiliary system where unaccusative verbs form perfects with BE, while transitive and unergative verbs form perfects with HAVE ...
  • Larsson, Ida; Johannessen, Janne Bondi (Chapter / Bokkapittel / AcceptedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2015)
    Published by Brill 2015.
  • Garbacz, Piotr; Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    [...] Omission of finite HAVE has no semantic effects, and examples without auxiliary can be interpreted either as present or as past perfects depending on context. Possessive HAVE is never omitted, and no other auxiliaries ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    The Nordic languages have the possibility of so-called pseudo-coordination, as in (1) (see e.g. Josefsson 1991, Brandt 1992, Wiklund 1996, Johannessen 1998, Lødrup 2002, Vannemo 2003, Bjerre & Bjerre 2007, Kvist Darnell ...
  • Johannessen, Janne Bondi; Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2018)
    Previous studies on gender in Scandinavian heritage languages in America have looked at noun-phrase internal agreement. It has been shown that some heritage speakers have non-target gender agreement, but this has been ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    Unlike English, the Nordic languages have non-finite forms of certain modal verbs (e.g. kunne/kunna ‘can inf.’), and these modals can be embedded under other modals, as in the Swedish example in (1) (see e.g. Thráinsson & ...
  • Larsson, Ida (Journal article / Tidsskriftartikkel / PublishedVersion; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    The Nordic languages differ with respect to word order in infinitives under causative lade ‘let’ (and cognates), in cases where the agent of the embedded verb is unspecified (see e.g. Taraldsen 1984, Platzack 1986a, ...