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dc.date.accessioned2021-06-14T15:34:05Z
dc.date.created2021-05-31T09:46:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationBach, Tobias . Bureaucracies and Policy Ideas. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. 2021 Oxford University Press
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/86374
dc.description.abstractThe idea of a clear separation between policymaking and implementation is difficult to sustain for policy bureaucracies in which public officials have “policy work” as their main activity. A diverse body of scholarship indicates that bureaucrats may enjoy substantial levels of discretion in defining the nature of policy problems and elaborating on policy alternatives. This observation raises questions about the conditions under which bureaucratic policy ideas make their way into authoritative policy decisions, the nature of those policy ideas, and how bureaucratic policymaking has evolved. A main point is that bureaucratic policy ideas are developed in a political context, meaning that bureaucrats have to anticipate that political decision makers will eventually have to endorse a policy proposal. The power relations between politicians and bureaucrats may, however, vary, and bureaucrats may gain the upper hand, which is likely if a bureaucracy is professionally homogenous and able to develop a coherent policy idea. Another perspective concerns the origins of policy ideas. There is limited evidence for individual-level explanations of policy ideas, according to which bureaucrats pursue exogenously defined preferences to maximize their own utility. A competing organizational perspective, which considers policy preferences as the result of organizational specialization, the development of local rationalities, and the defense of organizational turf, stands out as a more plausible explanation for the origins of bureaucratic policy ideas. The policymaking role, and thereby the importance of bureaucratic policy ideas, is being challenged by the rise of ministerial advisors, agencification, and better regulation reforms. Those developments have the potential to change the substance of bureaucratic policy ideas, but they may also generate strategic behavior, which should be of interest to scholars of the politics of bureaucracy.
dc.languageEN
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofOxford Research Encyclopedias
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOxford Research Encyclopedias
dc.titleBureaucracies and Policy Ideas
dc.typeChapter
dc.creator.authorBach, Tobias
dc.date.embargoenddate2023-05-26
cristin.unitcode185,17,8,0
cristin.unitnameInstitutt for statsvitenskap
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
dc.identifier.cristin1912734
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:book&rft.btitle=Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics&rft.spage=&rft.date=2021
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.1421
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-89015
dc.type.documentBokkapittel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.isbn0-00-000000-0
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/86374/2/Tobias_Bach_Bureaucracies%2Band%2BPolicy%2BIdeas_postprint.pdf
dc.type.versionAcceptedVersion
cristin.btitleOxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics


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