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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Seid M
dc.contributor.authorSundby, Johanne
dc.contributor.authorAragaw, Yesuf A
dc.contributor.authorNordeng, Hedvig
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-01T06:50:32Z
dc.date.available2020-12-01T06:50:32Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2020 Nov 26;20(1):737
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/81310
dc.description.abstractBackground Studies on medication-related problems (MRPs) among pregnant women are scarce, despite the potential consequences for both mother and child. This study aimed to describe the prevalence, clinical significance, and risk factors for MRPs among hospitalized pregnant or postpartum women at Jimma University Medical Centre (JUMC) in Ethiopia. Methods A prospective follow-up and clinical audit of 1117 hospitalized pregnant or postpartum women in the maternity and gynaecology wards at JUMC was carried out between February and June 2017. Patients were followed throughout their stay in the hospital to assess the presence and development of MRPs. Pre-tested data extraction form and an interview-guided structured questionnaire were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics were used to describe MRPs. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with MRPs. Results One or more MRPs occurred among 323 (28.9%) study participants, mostly in relation to lack of iron supplementation. A total of 278 (70.6%) of all MRPs were considered to be of moderate to high clinical significance. When excluding MRPs due to iron from the analysis, chronic disease (adjusted OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.02, 3.58), medication use prior to admission (adjusted OR 2.38; 95% CI 1.24, 4.56), nulliparity (adjusted OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.22, 3.24) and multiparity (adjusted OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.17, 3.12) were significantly associated with experiencing an MRP. Conclusions Nearly 3 out of 10 hospitalized pregnant women at JUMC had one or more MRPs. The need for additional iron therapy was by far the most common type of MRP. Improved adherence to guidelines on iron supplementation are required. Multidisciplinary approaches including physicians, nurses, anesthesia professionals and clinical pharmacists in the maternity and gynaecology wards could possibly prevent MRPs and promote patient safety for women and children.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleMedication-related problems among hospitalized pregnant women in a tertiary teaching hospital in Ethiopia: a prospective observational study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2020-12-01T06:50:32Z
dc.creator.authorAhmed, Seid M
dc.creator.authorSundby, Johanne
dc.creator.authorAragaw, Yesuf A
dc.creator.authorNordeng, Hedvig
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-020-03433-6
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-84394
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/81310/1/12884_2020_Article_3433.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid737


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