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dc.date.accessioned2020-08-27T18:59:59Z
dc.date.available2020-08-27T18:59:59Z
dc.date.created2020-07-24T14:20:18Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationGrønning Dale, Maria Teresa Nissen, Alexander Frantz William Berthelsen, Mona Heir, Trond . Post-traumatic stress reactions and doctor-certified sick leave after a workplace terrorist attack: Norwegian cohort study. BMJ Open. 2020, 10(2)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/78877
dc.description.abstractTo explore the association between the psychosocial work environment and the risk of sick leave among governmental employees with symptom-defined post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a workplace bomb attack.A prospective study on employees who met the symptom criteria for PTSD. Questionnaire data on the psychosocial work environment 10 months after the terrorist attack was linked to registry data on doctor-certified sick leave in the period 12–22 months after the attack.The bombing of the government ministries in Oslo, Norway, 22 July 2011.The study sample consists of 94 Norwegian governmental employees, all with symptom-defined PTSD from the Norwegian version of the PTSD checklist (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Specific) measured 10 months after the attack.After adjustment for sex and severity of PTSD symptoms, predictability at work reduced the odds of sick leave (adjusted OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.98). Sense of control over decisions at work was associated with fewer absence days for employees with sick leave (adjusted rate ratio=0.61, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.98).Employees with PTSD after workplace terrorism would benefit from control over their workplace conditions and increased predictability to reduce the risk of sick leave. The findings suggest that the work environment can facilitate employees’ work ability after stressful events, independent of severity of PTSD symptoms.
dc.languageEN
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titlePost-traumatic stress reactions and doctor-certified sick leave after a workplace terrorist attack: Norwegian cohort study
dc.typeJournal article
dc.creator.authorGrønning Dale, Maria Teresa
dc.creator.authorNissen, Alexander Frantz William
dc.creator.authorBerthelsen, Mona
dc.creator.authorHeir, Trond
cristin.unitcode185,17,5,0
cristin.unitnamePsykologisk institutt
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.cristin1820438
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=BMJ Open&rft.volume=10&rft.spage=&rft.date=2020
dc.identifier.jtitleBMJ Open
dc.identifier.volume10
dc.identifier.issue2
dc.identifier.pagecount0
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032693
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-81970
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/78877/2/Post-%2Btraumatic%2Bstress%2Breactions%2Band%2Bdoctor-certified%25C2%25ADsick%25C2%25ADleave%25C2%25ADafter%25C2%25ADaworkplace%25C2%25ADterrorist%25C2%25ADattack%25C2%25ADNorwegiancohort%2Bstudy.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleide032693


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