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dc.date.accessioned2020-08-17T19:04:26Z
dc.date.available2020-08-17T19:04:26Z
dc.date.created2020-01-21T17:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationAkca, Merve Laeng, Bruno Godøy, Rolf Inge . No Evidence for an Auditory Attentional Blink for Voices Regardless of Musical Expertise. Frontiers in Psychology. 2020, 10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/78456
dc.description.abstractBackground: Attending to goal-relevant information can leave us metaphorically “blind” or “deaf” to the next relevant information while searching among distracters. This temporal cost lasting for about a half a second on the human selective attention has been long explored using the attentional blink paradigm. Although there is evidence that certain visual stimuli relating to one’s area of expertise can be less susceptible to attentional blink effects, it remains unexplored whether the dynamics of temporal selective attention vary with expertise and objects types in the auditory modality. Methods: Using the auditory version of the attentional blink paradigm, the present study investigates whether certain auditory objects relating to musical and perceptual expertise could have an impact on the transient costs of selective attention. In this study, expert cellists and novice participants were asked to first identify a target sound, and then to detect instrumental timbres of cello or organ, or human voice as a second target in a rapid auditory stream. Results: The results showed moderate evidence against the attentional blink effect for voices independent of participants’ musical expertise. Experts outperformed novices in their overall accuracy levels of target identification and detection, reflecting a clear benefit of musical expertise. Importantly, the musicianship advantage disappeared when the human voices served as the second target in the stream. Discussion: The results are discussed in terms of stimulus salience, the advantage of voice processing, as well as perceptual and musical expertise in relation to attention and working memory performances.
dc.languageEN
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleNo Evidence for an Auditory Attentional Blink for Voices Regardless of Musical Expertise
dc.typeJournal article
dc.creator.authorAkca, Merve
dc.creator.authorLaeng, Bruno
dc.creator.authorGodøy, Rolf Inge
cristin.unitcode185,14,36,95
cristin.unitnameSenter for tverrfaglig forskning på rytme, tid og bevegelse (IMV)
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1779477
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Frontiers in Psychology&rft.volume=10&rft.spage=&rft.date=2020
dc.identifier.jtitleFrontiers in Psychology
dc.identifier.volume10
dc.identifier.pagecount13
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02935
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-81579
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/78456/2/Ak%25C3%25A7a%2BLaeng%2B%2526%2BGod%25C3%25B8y%2B%25282020%2529%2BNo%2BEvidence%2Bfor%2Ban%2BAuditory%2BAttentional%2BBlink%2Bfor%2BVoices%2BRegardless%2Bof%2BMusical%2BExpertise.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid2935
dc.relation.projectNFR/262762


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