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dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T18:17:50Z
dc.date.available2020-08-04T22:46:28Z
dc.date.created2019-04-25T20:01:08Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationØvrebø, Bente Stea, Tonje Holte te Velde, Saskia J. Bjelland, Mona Klepp, Knut Inge Bere, Elling Tufte . A comprehensive multicomponent school-based educational intervention did not affect fruit and vegetable intake at the 14-year follow-up. Preventive Medicine. 2019, 121, 79-85
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/77296
dc.description.abstractThe intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with beneficial health outcomes, and studies aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable intake lack long-term follow-up. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term (14-year) effects of a multicomponent school-based educational intervention targeted to increase fruit and vegetable intake in children. The secondary objective was to evaluate the potential synergistic effect between free school fruit and the educational program. A cluster randomized school-based intervention was initiated in 2001 in Norway, known as the Fruit and Vegetable Make the Marks study. In total, 38 schools were randomized; for the intervention (n = 18) and as control schools (n = 20). A subsample of the intervention schools (n = 9) were additionally given free school fruit, resulting in two intervention groups - one with and one without free fruit. Participants completed questionnaires in September 2001 (baseline, mean age 11.8), May 2002 (at the end of the intervention), May 2003, May 2005, September 2009 and throughout 2016 (mean age 26.5). Of 1950 participants, 982 (50.4%) completed the 14-year follow-up and were considered as the current study sample. Analysis yielded no 14-year effects of the educational program on fruit and vegetable intake. A synergistic effect between the educational program and free fruit was not observed either. Future studies might benefit from increased focus on more extensive parental involvement, increased home availability, and a longer intervention period. However, more long-term studies are needed to evaluate the effects of school-based interventions into adulthood.
dc.languageEN
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleA comprehensive multicomponent school-based educational intervention did not affect fruit and vegetable intake at the 14-year follow-up
dc.typeJournal article
dc.creator.authorØvrebø, Bente
dc.creator.authorStea, Tonje Holte
dc.creator.authorte Velde, Saskia J.
dc.creator.authorBjelland, Mona
dc.creator.authorKlepp, Knut Inge
dc.creator.authorBere, Elling Tufte
cristin.unitcode185,51,13,0
cristin.unitnameAvdeling for ernæringsvitenskap
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1694005
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Preventive Medicine&rft.volume=121&rft.spage=79&rft.date=2019
dc.identifier.jtitlePreventive Medicine
dc.identifier.volume121
dc.identifier.startpage79
dc.identifier.endpage85
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.02.015
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-80443
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn0091-7435
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/77296/4/1-s2.0-S0091743519300532-main.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion


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