Hide metadata

dc.date.accessioned2020-05-19T18:21:07Z
dc.date.available2020-05-19T18:21:07Z
dc.date.created2019-09-19T12:29:13Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationEikemo, Marie Lobmaier, Philipp Paul Pedersen, Mads Lund Kunøe, Nikolaj Matziorinis, Anna Maria Leknes, Siri Sarfi, Annamaria Monika . Intact responses to non-drug rewards in long-term opioid maintenance treatment. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2019, 44(8), 1456-1463
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/75944
dc.description.abstractDisruption of non-drug reward processing in addiction could stem from long-term drug use, addiction-related psychosocial stress, or a combination of these. It remains unclear whether long-term opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) disrupts reward processing. Here, we measured subjective and objective reward responsiveness in 26 previously heroin-addicted mothers in >7 years stable OMT with minimal psychosocial stress and illicit drug use. The comparison group was 30 healthy age-matched mothers (COMP). Objective reward responsiveness was assessed in a two-alternative forced-choice task with skewed rewards. Results were also compared to performance from an additional 968 healthy volunteers (meta-analytic approach). We further compared subprocesses of reward-based decisions across groups using computational modelling with a Bayesian drift diffusion model of decision making. Self-reported responsiveness to non-drug rewards was high for both groups (means: OMT = 6.59, COMP = 6.67, p = 0.84, BF10 = 0.29), yielding moderate evidence against subjective anhedonia in this OMT group. Importantly, the mothers in OMT also displayed robust reward responsiveness in the behavioral task (t19 = 2.72, p = 0.013, BF10 = 3.98; d = 0.61). Monetary reward changed their task behavior to the same extent as the local comparison group (reward bias OMT = 0.12, COMP = 0.12, p = 0.96, BF10 = 0.18) and in line with data from 968 healthy controls previously tested. Computational modelling revealed that long-term OMT did not even change decision subprocesses underpinning reward behavior. We conclude that reduced sensitivity to rewards and anhedonia are not necessary consequences of prolonged opioid use.
dc.languageEN
dc.titleIntact responses to non-drug rewards in long-term opioid maintenance treatment
dc.typeJournal article
dc.creator.authorEikemo, Marie
dc.creator.authorLobmaier, Philipp Paul
dc.creator.authorPedersen, Mads Lund
dc.creator.authorKunøe, Nikolaj
dc.creator.authorMatziorinis, Anna Maria
dc.creator.authorLeknes, Siri
dc.creator.authorSarfi, Annamaria Monika
cristin.unitcode185,53,10,12
cristin.unitnameSenter for rus- og avhengighetsforskning
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1726689
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Neuropsychopharmacology&rft.volume=44&rft.spage=1456&rft.date=2019
dc.identifier.jtitleNeuropsychopharmacology
dc.identifier.volume44
dc.identifier.issue8
dc.identifier.startpage1456
dc.identifier.endpage1463
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-019-0377-9
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-79094
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn0893-133X
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/75944/1/Reward%2Bin%2BOMT_NPP_Eikemo_authors_version.pdf
dc.type.versionAcceptedVersion


Files in this item

Appears in the following Collection

Hide metadata