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dc.date.accessioned2020-04-22T18:27:04Z
dc.date.available2020-04-22T18:27:04Z
dc.date.created2019-09-25T18:24:04Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationVaskinn, Anja Løvgren, André Egeland, Maj Kristoffersen Feyer, Frida Karine Østefjells, Tiril Andreassen, Ole Andreas Melle, Ingrid Sundet, Kjetil Søren . A randomized controlled trial of training of affect recognition (TAR) in schizophrenia shows lasting effects for theory of mind. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience. 2019, 269(5), 611-620
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/74744
dc.description.abstractSchizophrenia is characterized by social cognitive impairments that predict functioning. Social cognitive training aims to target these impairments. Although it can improve the targeted social cognitive domain, it is unclear if the training generalizes to non-targeted domains and to functioning, with lasting effects. This randomized controlled trial examined the effect of a targeted facial affect recognition training program, Training of Affect Recognition (TAR), in persons with schizophrenia. Individuals with schizophrenia were randomized to receive treatment as usual and TAR (n = 24) or treatment as usual (n = 24) after assessments with a comprehensive protocol at baseline (T1). Participants were reassessed immediately after the intervention period (T2: after 8 weeks) and at 3-month follow-up (T3). The protocol included tests of social cognition (facial or body affect recognition, theory of mind), nonsocial cognition (Matrics Consensus Cognitive Battery), clinical symptoms (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia), functioning (self-reported, social or nonsocial functional capacity), self-esteem, self-efficacy and insight. Linear mixed models yielded a significant group × time interaction effect for a non-targeted social cognitive domain (theory of mind) and a trend-level effect for social functional capacity with the intervention group performing better over time. No beneficial effects on nonsocial cognition, other measures of functioning, clinical symptoms, or self-esteem/self-efficacy appeared for the TAR program. This study provides evidence for transfer and durability effects of facial affect recognition training to theory of mind, but also highlights the need for additional treatments to achieve functional benefits.en_US
dc.languageEN
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial of training of affect recognition (TAR) in schizophrenia shows lasting effects for theory of minden_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.creator.authorVaskinn, Anja
dc.creator.authorLøvgren, André
dc.creator.authorEgeland, Maj Kristoffersen
dc.creator.authorFeyer, Frida Karine
dc.creator.authorØstefjells, Tiril
dc.creator.authorAndreassen, Ole Andreas
dc.creator.authorMelle, Ingrid
dc.creator.authorSundet, Kjetil Søren
cristin.unitcode185,17,5,0
cristin.unitnamePsykologisk institutt
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.cristin1729190
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience&rft.volume=269&rft.spage=611&rft.date=2019
dc.identifier.jtitleEuropean Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
dc.identifier.volume269
dc.identifier.issue5
dc.identifier.startpage611
dc.identifier.endpage620
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00406-019-00997-z
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-77885
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn0940-1334
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/74744/1/postprint_Vaskinn_TAR_EAPCN.pdf
dc.type.versionAcceptedVersion
dc.relation.projectNFR/223273
dc.relation.projectHSØ/2010007
dc.relation.projectHSØ/2017069


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