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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Kelsey Bates
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T23:47:23Z
dc.date.available2020-03-09T23:47:23Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationRichardson, Kelsey Bates. WHAT IS INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FOR? Exploring The Perspectives Of Jordanian Host-Country Parents Who Enroll Their Children In International Schools A Case Study of Aqaba International School in Aqaba, Jordan. Master thesis, University of Oslo, 2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/73842
dc.description.abstractThe international education sector is facing a proverbial identity crisis. Scholar upon scholar describes international education–as provided through international schools–as hard to define, ambiguous, and intermittently at odds with itself. At its core, there are schisms between pragmatic and ideological conceptualizations of the nature of international education. Nonetheless, international schools have cropped up all over the globe serving millions of students worldwide. The international education market is a billion dollar industry projected to continue its booming growth well beyond the next decade (Keeling, 2018). Initially, international schools served predominantly expatriate, internationally mobile families who were unable to avail themselves of the national education systems due to their outsider status. Recently however, local host-country parents have flocked to international schools, opting to abandon their local systems for international education. With this demographic shift, new questions arise in international education research. Why are host-country parents choosing to send their children to international schools over national education systems that may more closely align linguistically, culturally, and epistemologically with their own educational experiences? What skills, concepts and abilities do host-country parents believe international education should develop in their children? What are the perceived benefits of international education? This research attempts to investigate such questions in a bid to explore the host-country parent’s viewpoint through a dialectic perspective of Izquierdo and Marquez’s (2003) dual model of education. Based upon survey responses and problem-centered interviews administers at Aqaba International School in Aqaba, Jordan, host-country parents expressed their perceptions of and interests in international education. An analysis of the data yielded the highest rated response factors in this endeavor to be: 1.) I am sending my child to an international school because I want my child to learn in English; 2.) International education should teach my child English fluency; 3.) International education should develop my child’s character; and 4.) The purpose of international education is to prepare my child for higher education. Responses also highlighted the assumption that international education prepares their children for future success by providing advanced English capabilities and learning skills that will ultimately produce stronger students at the tertiary level and employees in the workforce. In these findings it was concluded that host-country parents are more heavily influenced by the perceived pragmatic benefits of international education than an interest in the internationally minded ideology of international education when choosing to enroll their child in international schools.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectInternational education; host-country parents; international schools; parental perspective; Jordan
dc.titleWHAT IS INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FOR? Exploring The Perspectives Of Jordanian Host-Country Parents Who Enroll Their Children In International Schools A Case Study of Aqaba International School in Aqaba, Jordaneng
dc.typeMaster thesis
dc.date.updated2020-03-10T23:46:13Z
dc.creator.authorRichardson, Kelsey Bates
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-76950
dc.type.documentMasteroppgave
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/73842/5/Thesis-Master-Final2.pdf


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