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dc.contributor.authorHylin, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorThrane, Helene
dc.contributor.authorPedersen, Kine
dc.contributor.authorKristiansen, Ivar S
dc.contributor.authorBurger, Emily A
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-14T06:15:59Z
dc.date.available2019-05-14T06:15:59Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationBMC Cancer. 2019 May 07;19(1):426
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/67946
dc.description.abstractBackground Public health efforts to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers include HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. We quantified the annual healthcare cost of six HPV-related cancers in order to provide inputs in cost-effectiveness analyses and quantify the potential economic savings from prevention of HPV-related cancers in Norway. Methods Using individual patient-level data from three unlinked population-based registries, we estimated the mean healthcare costs 1) annually across all phases of disease, 2) during the first 3 years of care following diagnosis, and 3) for the last 12 months of life for patients diagnosed with an HPV-related cancer. We included episodes of care related to primary care physicians, specialist care (private specialists and hospital-based care and prescriptions), and prescription drugs redeemed at pharmacies outside hospitals between 2012 and 2014. We valued costs (2014 €1.00 = NOK 8.357) based on diagnosis-related groups (DRG), patient copayments, reimbursement fees and pharmacy retail prices. Results In 2014, the total healthcare cost of HPV-related cancers amounted to €39.8 million, of which specialist care accounted for more than 99% of the total cost. The annual maximum economic burden potentially averted due to HPV vaccination will be lower for vulvar, penile and vaginal cancer (i.e., €984,620, €762,964 and €374,857, respectively) than for cervical, anal and oropharyngeal cancers (i.e., €17.2 million, €6.7 million and €4.6 million, respectively). Over the first three years of treatment following cancer diagnosis, patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer incurred the highest total cost per patient (i.e. €49,774), while penile cancer had the lowest total cost per patient (i.e. €18,350). In general, costs were highest the first year following diagnosis and then declined; however, costs increased rapidly again towards end of life for patients who did not survive. Conclusion HPV-related cancers constitute a considerable economic burden to the Norwegian healthcare system. As the proportion of HPV-vaccinated individuals increase and secondary prevention approaches advance, this study highlights the potential economic burden avoided by preventing these cancers.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThe Author(s).
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe healthcare costs of treating human papillomavirus-related cancers in Norway
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2019-05-14T06:15:59Z
dc.creator.authorHylin, Hannah
dc.creator.authorThrane, Helene
dc.creator.authorPedersen, Kine
dc.creator.authorKristiansen, Ivar S
dc.creator.authorBurger, Emily A
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12885-019-5596-2
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-71110
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/67946/1/12885_2019_Article_5596.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid426


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