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dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T14:42:10Z
dc.date.available2017-11-06T14:42:10Z
dc.date.created2016-01-12T17:07:47Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMaravela, Anastasia . Alphabetic Verses and Cipher Alphabets from Western Theban Monasteries: Perspectives on Monastic Literacy in Late Antique Egypt. Byzanz und das Abendland III. Studia Byzantino-Occidentalia. 2015, 67-83. Budapest: Eötvös-József-Collegium
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/59060
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews artefacts from monastic dwellings in Western Thebes, Upper Egypt, that transmit forms and variations of the alphabet, in an attempt to contribute to an ongoing scholarly discussion about the forms, aims and target audience of the educational activities in monastic communities of the area between the sixth and the eighth century. At that time the pharaonic necropolis became the hub of an intensive Christian monastic culture that made an indelible contribution to later perceptions of Egyptian monasticism, which the “Thebaid” became the imaginary landscape of. In the arid and, one might be tempted to say, “godless” landscape of the real Thebaid the Christian monks and hermits occupied the mortuary temples and the tombs of the royals and other eminencies of the pharaonic period, and redeveloped them into clusters of cells or individual hermits’ habitations. The nearest residential centre was the town of (D)jeme/Medinet Habu that developed on top of and around the mortuary temple of Ramesses III. Important monastic complexes in the area were: - Farthest to the north, on the hill Dra’ Abu el-Naga, the Deir el-Bachit (now finally identified with the topos of apa Paulos), the most extensive and populous of the monastic clusters in the area. - The monastery of St. Phoibammon/ Deir el-Bahari, which developed within the mortuary temple of the queen Hatshepsut. - This monastery probably traces its origins to a monastic settlement located at a spot that is accessible with difficulty up on the hills between Djeme and Ermant (Hermonthis), known as “le petit St. Phoibammon” (the lesser St. Phoibammon). - Several hermitages and clusters of hermitages on and around the hill of Sheikh Abd’ el-Gurneh. For a long time the best documented one was the Monastery of Epiphanius (TT103 tomb of vizier Daga, XI dynasty). Recently some of the neighbouring hermitages, e.g. the monastery of Cyriacus (TT65) and the hermitage occupied by Frange (TT29), were excavated, and are being studied in greater detail. The textual finds, mostly Christian literature of various genres and documentary texts in abundance, suggest that the dominant language was Egyptian (its written form at that time being Coptic), while Greek had a more modest and gradually waning presence and was probably read only by the more educated ascetics.en_US
dc.languageEN
dc.publisherEötvös-József-Collegium
dc.titleAlphabetic Verses and Cipher Alphabets from Western Theban Monasteries: Perspectives on Monastic Literacy in Late Antique Egypten_US
dc.typeChapteren_US
dc.creator.authorMaravela, Anastasia
cristin.unitcode185,14,33,0
cristin.unitnameInstitutt for filosofi, idé- og kunsthistorie og klassiske språk
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
dc.identifier.cristin1311424
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:book&rft.btitle=Byzanz und das Abendland III. Studia Byzantino-Occidentalia&rft.spage=67&rft.date=2015
dc.identifier.startpage67
dc.identifier.endpage83
dc.identifier.pagecount300
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-61634
dc.type.documentBokkapittelen_US
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.isbn978-615-5371-44-8
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/59060/1/Maravela%2B2015%2BAlphabetic%2Bverses%2Band%2Bcipher%2Balphabets.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.btitleByzanz und das Abendland III. Studia Byzantino-Occidentalia
dc.relation.project213660


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