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dc.date.accessioned2017-09-23T14:06:39Z
dc.date.available2017-09-23T14:06:39Z
dc.date.created2017-08-24T14:36:42Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationLupattelli, Angela Wood, Mollie Lapane, Kate L Spigset, Olav Nordeng, Hedvig Marie Egeland . Risk of preeclampsia after gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressants: A study from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/58481
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the risk of early- and late-onset preeclampsia across pregnancies exposed to antidepressants and to evaluate the impact of timing and length of gestational exposure to antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), on preeclampsia. Methods: The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, a prospective population-based study, and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided information on antidepressant exposure, depression, and anxiety symptoms in pregnancy, preeclampsia diagnoses, and important covariates. Within a pregnancy cohort of depressed women, we compared the risk of late-onset preeclampsia between SSRI-exposed and nonmedicated pregnancies using marginal structural models (weighted) and modified Poisson regression models. Results: Of the 5887 pregnancies included, 11.1% were exposed at any time before week 34 to SSRIs, 1.3% to serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, 0.4% to tricyclic antidepressants, and 0.5% to other antidepressants. The risks of early- and late-onset preeclampsia by exposure status in pregnancy were 0.3% and 3.6% (nonmedicated), 0.4% and 3.7% (SSRIs), 1.5% and 4.1% (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), and 7.1% and 10.0% (tricyclic antidepressants). Compared with nonmedicated pregnancies, SSRI-exposed in mid and late gestation had adjusted relative risks for late-onset mild preeclampsia of 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.38-1.53) and 1.56 (0.71-3.44) (weighted models), respectively. There was no association between SSRI exposure in pregnancy and severe late-onset preeclampsia. Conclusions: We have provided evidence that SSRI use in early and midpregnancy does not substantially increase the risk of late-onset preeclampsia.en_US
dc.languageEN
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleRisk of preeclampsia after gestational exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other antidepressants: A study from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.creator.authorLupattelli, Angela
dc.creator.authorWood, Mollie
dc.creator.authorLapane, Kate L
dc.creator.authorSpigset, Olav
dc.creator.authorNordeng, Hedvig Marie Egeland
cristin.unitcode185,15,23,10
cristin.unitnameFarmasi
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode2
dc.identifier.cristin1488402
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety&rft.volume=&rft.spage=&rft.date=2017
dc.identifier.jtitlePharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
dc.identifier.pagecount11
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pds.4286
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-61184
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn1053-8569
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/58481/2/Lupattelli_2017_Ris.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion


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