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dc.date.accessioned2017-03-31T11:10:44Z
dc.date.available2017-03-31T11:10:44Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/55141
dc.description.abstractIn recent decades, the landscapes of work and organizations in developed economies have undergone dramatic changes, including the growth in service- and knowledge-oriented industries. Based on the rapid growth and increasing importance of knowledge work leading scholars have called for research exploring questions such as: What are the salient organizational practices and characteristics in knowledge work settings? To what extent are these organizational practices and work characteristics captured by existing theories and models? In this PhD research project and thesis I have sought to elucidate these questions through two overall research aims: First, to examine the value of situation-specific and general models of work in knowledge work settings. Second, to develop theory of salient organizational practices and work characteristics in three particular knowledge work settings: universities, police investigative work and large-scale projects in the oil and gas industry. In the thesis I present four papers that contribute to these two overall aims. In Paper I, we examined to what extent general and situation-specific work environment instruments capture the organizational practices and work characteristics experienced as salient in a university setting. We compared three situation-specific survey instruments (Assessing the climate for creativity [KEYS], Situational Outlook Questionnaire [SOQ], and the Organizational Climate Measure – an adapted version for the university setting [OCM]) and two general survey instruments (the General Nordic Questionnaire for Psychological and Social Factors at Work [QPSNordic] and the Job Diagnostic Survey [JDS]). The findings indicated that the situation-specific instruments KEYS and OCM captured more of the employees’ interview statements about the work environment than the general instruments QPSNordic and JDS. As such, the findings support the relevance of situation-specific instruments in the Norwegian university setting. In Paper II, we investigated how the broader social and economic environment was perceived to affect the work system in a university setting. The findings indicated that a market-oriented model of governance was experienced to have complex negative and positive effects on the work system. The perceived negative effects included stronger management, reduced job security and autonomy, increased demands, and exacerbated intergroup relations, while the perceived positive effects comprised enhanced intra-group interdependence, feedback, and support. In sum, the findings suggest that a market-oriented model of governance could have negative effects on the long-term effectiveness of the work system in this setting. In Paper III, we aimed to identify climate dimensions experienced as central to project success, and to develop a model of organizational climate in large-scale projects in the oil and gas industry. The findings showed that a climate characterized by a strong focus on a) communication and cooperation with actors in the external environment such as vendors, and b) internal cooperation and communication with other projects and with the line organization was perceived as perceived as critical to project success. We used these findings to develop a situation-specific model of organizational climate for this setting called the Organizational Climate Measure for Large-Scale Project Organizations in the Oil and Gas Industry (OCMP). In Paper IV, we aimed to identify a) organizational climate dimensions that are salient for performance in police investigations and b) potential mechanisms of the relationship between climate and investigation performance. The findings indicated that two climate types, a Human Relations climate and a Rational Goal climate, were perceived to enhance police investigation performance. A Human Relations climate was perceived to enhance investigation performance by developing collective human, capital, and by supporting internal and external cooperation and coordination of resources. A Rational Goal climate was experienced to increase investigation performance by encouraging planning, goal-setting, and task focus. In summary, the studies in this thesis generally support the value of situation-specific survey instruments and models in the university setting, large-scale projects in the oil and gas industry, and to some extent in police investigative work. Moreover, the findings expand our understanding of central organizational practices and work characteristics in the three work settings. Researchers and practitioners are likely to benefit from using the situation-specific models developed in Paper II, III, and IV for further research as well as organizational development processes in these settings. Finally, the studies provide insight into knowledge work more generally as they identify and describe two categories of organizational practices and work characteristics experienced as salient across the three work settings: a) Organizational climate dimensions and social characteristics related to within-group and intergroup cooperation, and b) practices of high-commitment HRM systems. Based on the findings in the papers I outline promising avenues for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.haspartPaper I Lone, J. A., Bjørklund, R., Østerud, K. B., Anderssen, L. A., Hoff, T., & Bjørkli, C. A. (2014). Assessing knowledge-intensive work environment: General versus situation-specific instruments. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 23(3), 469-482. The paper is not available in DUO http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2012.750449
dc.relation.haspartPaper II Lone, J. A., Riege, A. H., Bjørklund, R., Hoff, T., & Bjørkli, C. (2015). The relationship between the broader environment and the work system in a university setting: a systems approach. Studies in Higher Education, 1-20. The paper is not available in DUO http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2015.1034259
dc.relation.haspartPaper III Hannevik, M. B., Lone, J. A., Bjørklund, R., Bjørkli, C. A., & Hoff, T. (2014). Organizational climate in large-scale projects in the oil and gas industry: A competing values perspective. International Journal of Project Management, 32(4), 687–697. The paper is not available in DUO http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijproman.2013.08.006
dc.relation.haspartPaper IV Lone, J.A., Garnås, A., Myklebust, T., Bjørklund, R., Hoff, T., & Bjørkli, C.A. (2017). Organizational Climate and Investigation Performance in the Norwegian Police: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. The paper is not available in DUO http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jip.1474
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2012.750449
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2015.1034259
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijproman.2013.08.006
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jip.1474
dc.titleExploring Knowledge Work: Organizational Practices and Work Characteristics in Three Knowledge Work Settingsen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.creator.authorLone, Jon Anders
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-57947
dc.type.documentDoktoravhandlingen_US
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/55141/1/PhD-Lone-DUO.pdf


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