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dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T12:56:40Z
dc.date.available2016-02-09T12:56:40Z
dc.date.created2015-10-30T07:38:25Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationKuczkowska, Katarzyna Mathiesen, Geir Eijsink, Vincent Øynebråten, Inger . Lactobacillus plantarum displaying CCL3 chemokine in fusion with HIV-1 Gag derived antigen causes increased recruitment of T cells. Microbial Cell Factories. 2015, 14(169)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/49075
dc.description.abstractBackground Chemokines are attractive candidates for vaccine adjuvants due to their ability to recruit the immune cells. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB)-based delivery vehicles have potential to be used as a cheap and safe option for vaccination. Chemokine produced on the surface of LAB may potentially enhance the immune response to an antigen and this approach can be considered in development of future mucosal vaccines. Results We have constructed strains of Lactobacillus plantarum displaying a chemokine on their surface. L. plantarum was genetically engineered to express and anchor to the surface a protein called CCL3Gag. CCL3Gag is a fusion protein comprising of truncated HIV-1 Gag antigen and the murine chemokine CCL3, also known as MIP-1α. Various surface anchoring strategies were explored: (1) a lipobox-based covalent membrane anchor, (2) sortase-mediated covalent cell wall anchoring, (3) LysM-based non-covalent cell wall anchoring, and (4) an N-terminal signal peptide-based transmembrane anchor. Protein production and correct localization were confirmed using Western blotting, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Using a chemotaxis assay, we demonstrated that CCL3Gag-producing L. plantarum strains are able to recruit immune cells in vitro. Conclusions The results show the ability of engineered L. plantarum to produce a functional chemotactic protein immobilized on the bacterial surface. We observed that the activity of surface-displayed CCL3Gag differed depending on the type of anchor used. The chemokine which is a part of the bacteria-based vaccine may increase the recruitment of immune cells and, thereby, enhance the reaction of the immune system to the vaccine.en_US
dc.languageEN
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleLactobacillus plantarum displaying CCL3 chemokine in fusion with HIV-1 Gag derived antigen causes increased recruitment of T cellsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.creator.authorKuczkowska, Katarzyna
dc.creator.authorMathiesen, Geir
dc.creator.authorEijsink, Vincent
dc.creator.authorØynebråten, Inger
cristin.unitcode185,53,2,11
cristin.unitnameSenter for immunregulering
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.cristin1284755
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Microbial Cell Factories&rft.volume=14&rft.spage=&rft.date=2015
dc.identifier.jtitleMicrobial Cell Factories
dc.identifier.volume14
dc.identifier.issue169
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12934-015-0360-z
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-52885
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn1475-2859
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/49075/1/BMCMicrCellFacart-10-1186-252-12934-015-0360-z.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion


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