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dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:27:08Z
dc.date.available2016-08-24T22:31:04Z
dc.date.created2015-09-15T12:50:10Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationFjell, Anders Martin Sneve, Markus Handal Grydeland, Håkon Storsve, Andreas Berg de Lange, Ann-Marie Glasø Amlien, Inge Kasbohm Røgeberg, Ole Walhovd, Kristine B . Functional connectivity change across multiple cortical networks relates to episodic memory changes in aging. Neurobiology of Aging. 2015, 36(12), 3255-3268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/48983
dc.description.abstractA major task of contemporary cognitive neuroscience of aging is to explain why episodic memory declines. Change in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) could be a mechanism accounting for reduced function. We addressed this through 3 studies. In study 1, 119 healthy participants (20–83 years) were followed for 3.5 years with verbal recall testing and magnetic resonance imaging. Independent of atrophy, recall change was related to change in rsFC in anatomically widespread areas. Striking age-effects were observed in that a positive relationship between rsFC and memory characterized older participants while a negative relationship was seen among the younger and middle-aged. This suggests that cognitive consequences of rsFC change are not stable across age. In study 2 and 3, the age-dependent differences in rsFC-memory relationship were replicated by use of a simulation model (study 2) and by a cross-sectional experimental recognition memory task (study 3). In conclusion, memory changes were related to altered rsFC in an age-dependent manner, and future research needs to detail the mechanisms behind age-varying relationships.en_US
dc.languageEN
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Science
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleFunctional connectivity change across multiple cortical networks relates to episodic memory changes in agingen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.creator.authorFjell, Anders Martin
dc.creator.authorSneve, Markus Handal
dc.creator.authorGrydeland, Håkon
dc.creator.authorStorsve, Andreas Berg
dc.creator.authorde Lange, Ann-Marie Glasø
dc.creator.authorAmlien, Inge Kasbohm
dc.creator.authorRøgeberg, Ole
dc.creator.authorWalhovd, Kristine B
cristin.unitcode185,17,5,0
cristin.unitnamePsykologisk institutt
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1
dc.identifier.cristin1264325
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.jtitle=Neurobiology of Aging&rft.volume=36&rft.spage=3255&rft.date=2015
dc.identifier.jtitleNeurobiology of Aging
dc.identifier.volume36
dc.identifier.issue12
dc.identifier.startpage3255
dc.identifier.endpage3268
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.08.020
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-52804
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.source.issn0197-4580
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/48983/4/Fjell-et-al-with-statement.pdf
dc.type.versionAcceptedVersion


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