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dc.contributor.authorEvensen, Kine Myhre
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-20T23:00:09Z
dc.date.available2016-01-20T23:00:09Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationEvensen, Kine Myhre. Joint Visual Attention and Gaze Behavior in Infancy. Master thesis, University of Oslo, 2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/48651
dc.description.abstractJoint visual attention is one of most important ways to communicate and socially relate to others, especially through facial expressions. Previous research using EEG have found an amplified sensitivity to happy faces for 7-month-olds, and a sensitivity similar to that seen in adults in 12-month-olds viewing angry faces (Grossmann, Striano, & Friederici, 2007). In this study, the primary hypothesis was that 6-month-old infants would show a greater gaze allocation to happy faces than angry or neutral, whereas 12-month-old infants would show a greater gaze allocation to angry faces. In addition, we hypothesized that female infants would look longer at faces than male infants in the 12-month-group, more so on angry than neutral or happy faces. Results did not support our hypotheses, but we found an interesting gender difference. Female infants looked longer at the model's face than males, independent of their age and emotion viewed. Possible explanations linked to amygdalar development are discussed.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectjoint
dc.subjectvisual
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjecteye
dc.subjecttracking
dc.subjectinfancy
dc.subjectamygdala
dc.titleJoint Visual Attention and Gaze Behavior in Infancyeng
dc.typeMaster thesis
dc.date.updated2016-01-20T23:00:08Z
dc.creator.authorEvensen, Kine Myhre
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-52511
dc.type.documentMasteroppgave
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/48651/1/Master-thesis-FINAL.pdf


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