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dc.contributor.authorGamperiene, Migle
dc.contributor.authorNygård, Jan F
dc.contributor.authorSandanger, Inger
dc.contributor.authorWærsted, Morten
dc.contributor.authorBruusgaard, Dag
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-09T02:13:28Z
dc.date.available2015-10-09T02:13:28Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology. 2006 Nov 01;1(1):24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/46793
dc.description.abstractBackground This study examined the association between psychosocial and organizational work conditions and mental health among women employed in the cleaning profession in Norway. Methods Self-report questionnaires were mailed to 661 cleaning staff personnel from seven cleaning organizations in seven different cities across Norway. The response rate was 64%, of which 374 (88%) respondents were women. The questionnaires assessed socio-demographic information and employment history, work organization, and psychosocial working conditions. The Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25) was included to assess mental health. Results On average, respondents were 43 years old and reported 10.8 years of experience working in the cleaning industry. The proportion of women scoring a HSCL-25 equal to or above 1.75 was 17.5%, which was higher than the average prevalence of mental health problems among working Norwegian women (8.4%). A factor analysis of the questions specific to the psychosocial work environment identified the following four underlying dimensions: leadership, co-workers, time pressure/control, and information/knowledge. Two of these, poor satisfaction with leadership (OR = 3.6) and poor satisfaction with co-workers (OR = 2.3), were significantly related to mental health. In addition, having contact with colleagues less than once a day (OR = 2.4) and not being ethnically Norwegian (OR = 3.0) increased the risk for mental health problems. Conclusion Mental health problems are frequent among female cleaning professionals in Norway. Our results indicate that quality of leadership, collaboration with co-workers, and ethnicity were significantly associated with mental health.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsGamperiene et al.; Licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 Generic
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.titleThe impact of psychosocial and organizational working conditions on the mental health of female cleaning personnel in Norway
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2015-10-09T02:13:28Z
dc.creator.authorGamperiene, Migle
dc.creator.authorNygård, Jan F
dc.creator.authorSandanger, Inger
dc.creator.authorWærsted, Morten
dc.creator.authorBruusgaard, Dag
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6673-1-24
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-50973
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/46793/1/12995_2006_Article_24.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid24


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