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dc.contributor.authorBecker, Frank
dc.contributor.authorReinvang, Ivar
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-09T02:13:04Z
dc.date.available2015-10-09T02:13:04Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral and Brain Functions. 2007 Jan 19;3(1):6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/46775
dc.description.abstractBackground The role of impaired sound and speech sound processing for auditory language comprehension deficits in aphasia is unclear. No electrophysiological studies of attended speech sound processing in aphasia have been performed for stimuli that are discriminable even for patients with severe auditory comprehension deficits. Methods Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to study speech sound processing in a syllable detection task in aphasia. In an oddball paradigm, the participants had to detect the infrequent target syllable /ta:/ amongst the frequent standard syllable /ba:/. 10 subjects with moderate and 10 subjects with severe auditory comprehension impairment were compared to 11 healthy controls. Results N1 amplitude was reduced indicating impaired primary stimulus analysis; N1 reduction was a predictor for auditory comprehension impairment. N2 attenuation suggests reduced attended stimulus classification and discrimination. However, all aphasic patients were able to discriminate the stimuli almost without errors, and processes related to the target identification (P3) were not significantly reduced. The aphasic subjects might have discriminated the stimuli by purely auditory differences, while the ERP results reveal a reduction of language-related processing which however did not prevent performing the task. Topographic differences between aphasic subgroups and controls indicate compensatory changes in activation. Conclusion Stimulus processing in early time windows (N1, N2) is altered in aphasics with adverse consequences for auditory comprehension of complex language material, while allowing performance of simpler tasks (syllable detection). Compensational patterns of speech sound processing may be activated in syllable detection, but may not be functional in more complex tasks. The degree to which compensational processes can be activated probably varies depending on factors as lesion site, time after injury, and language task.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsBecker and Reinvang; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 Generic
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.titleSuccessful syllable detection in aphasia despite processing impairments as revealed by event-related potentials
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2015-10-09T02:13:05Z
dc.creator.authorBecker, Frank
dc.creator.authorReinvang, Ivar
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1744-9081-3-6
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-50963
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/46775/1/12993_2006_Article_74.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid6


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