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dc.contributor.authorNiclas Piro, Fredrik
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Christian
dc.contributor.authorNæss, Øyvind
dc.contributor.authorNafstad, Per
dc.contributor.authorClaussen, Bjørgulf
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-09T01:53:19Z
dc.date.available2015-10-09T01:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health. 2008 Feb 28;7(1):9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/46541
dc.description.abstractObjective To explore various contributors to people's reporting of self reported air pollution problems in area of living, including GIS-modeled air pollution, and to investigate whether those with respiratory or other chronic diseases tend to over-report air pollution problems, compared to healthy people. Methods Cross-sectional data from the Oslo Health Study (2000–2001) were linked with GIS-modeled air pollution data from the Norwegian Institute of Air Research. Multivariate regression analyses were performed. 14 294 persons aged 30, 40, 45, 60 or 75 years old with complete information on modeled and self reported air pollution were included. Results People who reported air pollution problems were exposed to significantly higher GIS-modeled air pollution levels than those who did not report such problems. People with chronic disease, reported significantly more air pollution problems after adjustment for modeled levels of nitrogen dioxides, socio-demographic variables, smoking, depression, dwelling conditions and an area deprivation index, even if they had a non-respiratory disease. No diseases, however, were significantly associated with levels of nitrogen dioxides. Conclusion Self reported air pollution problems in area of living are strongly associated with increased levels of GIS-modeled air pollution. Over and above this, those who report to have a chronic disease tend to report more air pollution problems in area of living, despite no significant difference in air pollution exposure compared to healthy people, and no associations between these diseases and NO2. Studies on the association between self reported air pollution problems and health should be aware of the possibility that disease itself may influence the reporting of air pollution.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsPiro et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 Generic
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
dc.titleA comparison of self reported air pollution problems and GIS-modeled levels of air pollution in people with and without chronic diseases
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.updated2015-10-09T01:53:20Z
dc.creator.authorNiclas Piro, Fredrik
dc.creator.authorMadsen, Christian
dc.creator.authorNæss, Øyvind
dc.creator.authorNafstad, Per
dc.creator.authorClaussen, Bjørgulf
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-069X-7-9
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-50731
dc.type.documentTidsskriftartikkel
dc.type.peerreviewedPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/46541/1/12940_2007_Article_148.pdf
dc.type.versionPublishedVersion
cristin.articleid9


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