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dc.contributor.authorRylander, Anders Nandrup
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T22:00:50Z
dc.date.available2015-08-21T22:00:50Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationRylander, Anders Nandrup. American Foreign Aid and Foreign Policy: American foreign aid to Afghanistan in relation to American foreign policy, foreign policy traditions, and American interests. Master thesis, University of Oslo, 2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/44857
dc.description.abstractThe presented Masters Thesis seeks do develop a better understanding of the relationship between American foreign aid, American foreign policy traditions, American foreign policy towards Afghanistan for the years 2007-2012, and American interests. It does so by answering the following questions: Theories on development typologies reveal that there are several ways to build a failed state, but what particular type of state building does the U.S. government do, and what is their reasoning for doing it? And is this consistent with its foreign policy? How does this relate to American foreign policy traditions and American interests? In order to do this I define American foreign policy traditions and American self-interest, as well as accounting for three different development typologies: State-building, nation-building, and society-building. To connect these aspects of American foreign relations to a specific case, I analyse the American aid efforts in Afghanistan for the years 2007-2012, using American reports to OECD, accounting for Official Development Assistance (ODA). The data is divided according to the three typologies in order to discuss the American strategy when donating aid and forming foreign policy goals. The analysis and discussion of the thesis exposes that American aid work in Afghanistan at some points is consistent with American foreign policy goals in Afghanistan, but also that there are conflicting elements between foreign policy goals and the aid effort during the years researched. The American foreign policy goals in Afghanistan also contain elements of at least two American foreign policy traditions, exposing a difference between the foreign relation strategy of the Truman Doctrine and the Bush Doctrine. American interests are present in all foreign policy goals and the aid effort in Afghanistan, but somewhat surprisingly, they are not rooted in economic interests; stability and safety for American citizens are the predominant American interests being represented when the U.S. government contributed with foreign aid in Afghanistan.eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectforeign
dc.subjectaid
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectforeign
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectforeign
dc.subjectpolicy
dc.subjecttraditions
dc.subjectAmerican
dc.subjectinterests
dc.titleAmerican Foreign Aid and Foreign Policy: American foreign aid to Afghanistan in relation to American foreign policy, foreign policy traditions, and American interestseng
dc.typeMaster thesis
dc.date.updated2015-08-21T22:02:31Z
dc.creator.authorRylander, Anders Nandrup
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-49085
dc.type.documentMasteroppgave
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/44857/1/Rylander_master.pdf


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