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dc.contributor.authorIndgjerd, Hallvard Rübner
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-12T23:00:13Z
dc.date.available2014-11-12T23:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationIndgjerd, Hallvard Rübner. The Grave Goods of Roman Hierapolis: an analysis of the finds from four multiple burial tombs. Master thesis, University of Oslo, 2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/41584
dc.description.abstractThe Hellenistic and Roman city of Hierapolis in Phrygia, South-Western Asia Minor, boasts one of the largest necropoleis known from the Roman world. While the grave monuments have seen long-lasting interest, few funerary contexts have been subject to excavation and publication. The present study analyses the artefact finds from four tombs, investigating the context of grave gifts and funerary practices with focus on the Roman imperial period. It considers to what extent the finds influence and reflect varying identities of Hierapolitan individuals over time. Combined, the tombs use cover more than 1500 years, paralleling the life-span of the city itself. Although the material is far too small to give a conclusive view of funerary assem-blages in Hierapolis, the attempted close study and contextual integration of the objects does yield some results with implications for further studies of funerary contexts on the site and in the wider region. The use of standard grave goods items, such as unguentaria, lamps and coins, is found to peak in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. Clay unguentaria were used alongside glass ones more than a century longer than what is usually seen outside of Asia Minor, and this period saw the development of new forms, partially resembling Hellenistic types. Some burials did not include any grave gifts, and none were extraordinarily rich, pointing towards a standardised, minimalistic set of funerary objects. Evidence of Pagan, Jewish and Christian burials is found not to be visible in the grave gifts of the Roman period. Also aspects of social status, and local or ethnic identity are only scarcely attested. Individual and group identities seem to be manifest in tomb monuments and inscriptions, rather than in objects involved in funerary rites. The consequence of this is a material that is largely "Roman".eng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectHierapolis
dc.subjectAsia
dc.subjectMinor
dc.subjectGrave
dc.subjectgoods
dc.subjectPottery
dc.subjectFunerary
dc.subjectrites
dc.titleThe Grave Goods of Roman Hierapolis: an analysis of the finds from four multiple burial tombseng
dc.typeMaster thesis
dc.date.updated2014-11-12T23:00:12Z
dc.creator.authorIndgjerd, Hallvard Rübner
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-46078
dc.type.documentMasteroppgave
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/41584/1/Thesis_final-H_Indgjerd.pdf


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