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dc.date.accessioned2013-03-12T12:38:32Z
dc.date.available2013-03-12T12:38:32Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-04-25en_US
dc.identifier.citationMidtgaard, Mirim. Prevalensen av psykiske problemer med behov for hjelp under medisinstudiet - identifisering av prediktorer i de tre første studieårene med tanke på tidlig intervensjon. Prosjektoppgave, University of Oslo, 2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/29449
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background: This study examined the prevalence of reported mental health problems in need of treatment among Norwegian medical students. It also tried to identify the possible individual and environmental predictors associated with mental health problems in need of treatment among this group. Methods: Based on a longitudinal, nationwide questionnaire that was sent to all Norwegian medical students (N=473) entering Norwegian medical schools in 1993 (T1), and also three years (T2) and six years (T3) after enrolling. At each stage the number of students participating was higher than in the longitudinal sample and these numbers were used when finding the prevalence shown in the tables (cross-sectional sample). Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Results: The lifetime prevalence of mental health problems in need of treatment in the first undergraduate year was reported by 15 % (56). At T2 33 % (112) reported experiencing mental health problems in need of treatment during their first three undergraduate years. Despite of reporting mental health problems in need of treatment, 54 % (61/112) of the third year medical students admitted not seeking professional help during this period of time. At T3 28 % (105) reported mental health problems in need of treatment, with 16 % (56) experiencing this the preceding year. Adjusted predictors of mental health problems in need of treatment the first three undergraduate years were: Previous mental health problems (OR=5.6), negative life events during the last 12 months (OR=2.5) and the personality trait of extroversion (OR=0.8). Conclusion: This study shows that 1/3 of third year medical students reported having mental health problems in need of treatment during their first three undergraduate years, of which 1/2 had not sought professional help. Those experiencing mental health problems in need of treatment prior to starting medical school had a five-fold increased risk of developing similar problems during their first three undergraduate years. The impact of negative life events is more important than perceived medical school stress as to whether they experience mental health problems in need of treatment. An extroverted personality seems to be protective against developing mental health problems during the first three undergraduate years.nor
dc.language.isonoben_US
dc.titlePrevalensen av psykiske problemer med behov for hjelp under medisinstudiet - identifisering av prediktorer i de tre første studieårene med tanke på tidlig intervensjonen_US
dc.typeMaster thesisen_US
dc.date.updated2007-07-26en_US
dc.creator.authorMidtgaard, Mirimen_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::805en_US
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&rft.au=Midtgaard, Mirim&rft.title=Prevalensen av psykiske problemer med behov for hjelp under medisinstudiet - identifisering av prediktorer i de tre første studieårene med tanke på tidlig intervensjon&rft.inst=University of Oslo&rft.date=2007&rft.degree=Prosjektoppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-15295en_US
dc.type.documentProsjektoppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.duo57551en_US
dc.contributor.supervisorReidar Tyssenen_US
dc.identifier.bibsys071016759en_US
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/29449/4/Prosjektoppg.Midtgaard.pdf


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