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dc.date.accessioned2013-03-12T12:33:42Z
dc.date.available2013-03-12T12:33:42Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-06-07en_US
dc.identifier.citationHaande, Rut Heidi. Expression of LTC4-synthase in small intestinal mucosa of celiac patients and controls. Prosjektoppgave, University of Oslo, 2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/29109
dc.description.abstractIncreased levels of the Th2-associated leukotriene C4 (LTC4) have been described in celiac disease. LTC4 is mainly produced by LTC4-synthase containing mast cells and eosinophils in a Th2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-5) depended manner, cytokines which are not increased in the Th1 dominated celiac inflammation. AIM: Identify the LTC4-synthase containing cells and examine their distribution in small intestinal mucosa from celiac patients and controls. METHODS: Small intestinal biopsies from 28 celiac children (14 untreated, 14 treated), and 15 controls were studied by multicolor immunohistofluorescence microscopy. Antisera to LTC4-synthase and microsomal glutathione transferase-2 (MGST2) were combined with cell specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to identify mast cells (c-kit), eosinophils (EG2) or macrophages (CD68 and HLA-DR). RESULTS: Whereas the majority (96%) of submucosal mast cells expressed high levels of perinuclear LTC4-synthase in controls and treated celiac disease, relatively few eosinophils expressed low levels (7% and 5% respectively). This distribution shifted somewhat in untreated celiac disease as fewer mast cells (85%, p<0,003), but more eosinophils (19%, p<0,02) contained LTC4-synthase. There was a high density of extracellular mAb EG2+ granula in untreated celiac disease, suggesting eosinophil activation. Sections contained occasionally some scattered LTC4-synthase positive macrofages and endothelial cells. The intestinal perivascular smooth muscle and lamina muscularis mucosa contained MGST2 but not LTC4-synthase. CONCLUSION: Although the proportion of LTC4-synthase containing eosinophils increased in untreated celiac disease, mast cells remained the dominating LTC4-synthase containing cell. Subepithelial complement activation may activate both mast cells and eosinophils to produce LTC4 in untreated celiac disease. Interesting, a recent case study reported symptom relief and apparently cure of celiac disease (non tropical sprue), after using leukotriene receptor CysLT1 antagonist (Montelukast). Thus increased leukotriene production may have a greater impact on celiac immunopathology than currently acknowledged.nor
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.titleExpression of LTC4-synthase in small intestinal mucosa of celiac patients and controlsen_US
dc.typeMaster thesisen_US
dc.date.updated2007-08-17en_US
dc.creator.authorHaande, Rut Heidien_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::716en_US
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&rft.au=Haande, Rut Heidi&rft.title=Expression of LTC4-synthase in small intestinal mucosa of celiac patients and controls&rft.inst=University of Oslo&rft.date=2007&rft.degree=Prosjektoppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-15570en_US
dc.type.documentProsjektoppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.duo61948en_US
dc.contributor.supervisorTrond S. Halstensenen_US
dc.identifier.bibsys071146733en_US
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/29109/3/Prosjektoppg.Haande.pdf


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