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dc.date.accessioned2013-11-14T11:51:45Z
dc.date.available2013-11-14T11:51:45Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-10-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationBesseberg, Trine. Sport and media in the "Information Society". Masteroppgave, University of Oslo, 2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10852/17817
dc.description.abstractInformation appears to be a symbol of the world we live in, what to make of this symbol has, however, been a source of controversy. Many European researchers argue that we find ourselves in a ‘ Information Society’ where information technologies have, in one way or the other, a transforming effect in society. These researchers are what we call technological determinists. Technological determinism is the single most influential theory of the relationship between technology and society. From this perspective, the nature of technologies and the direction of change are unproblematic and pre-determined. Technology has necessary and determinate “impacts” or “effects” upon work, economic life and upon society as a whole. The social shaping of technology approach is in a way contrary to that determinism. These scholars acknowledge that there has been a ‘information explosion’ in the European Society, but argue that it is premature to conceive of an information society. In evaluating information technologies investments have so far been on primarily economic and technological factors, however, the social shaping of technology approach points out the importance of including characteristics such as the social, organisational and political. Social constructivist technology studies are united by the insistence of opening the black box of technology. Socio-economic patterns embedded in both the content of technologies and the process of innovation must be exposed and analysed. Important features of the ‘information society’ are the leisure and entertainment industries, and hence, sport and media. Sport is a contemporary medium for performing many tasks and carrying multiple messages and, as such, is increasingly indistinguishable from the sports media. From a sociological point of view ‘sport’ does not have a fixed meaning, but is a concept that has different meanings in different societies. The meaning of the term sport involves a form of social construction This dissertation does not offer any simply essentialist definition of sport, but it does include a four-divide of the sporting activities. The reason for this is to point out the diversity, and to limit the discussion to one of the subgroups, namely professional sport. Sport, sportsmen, sports associations and clubs are actors in cultural life, in politics and in economic. However, the full cultural and ideological significance of sport is brought into being through mediation on television and in the press. In the latter decades of the 20th century there were great changes brought about in the practices, technologies, public uses, and reach of communication media. The most recent introduction is digital technology. Sports programming are easy to produce and attract big numbers of viewers, and have hence attracted media’s attention. The study of contemporary media emerged alongside the contemporary mass media, and predates the establishment of the discipline known as ‘media studies’. The earlier approaches were mainly deterministic, and tried to measure the effects and impacts of media in society. The more recent, and certainly more sophisticated, approaches believe that the media technologies are social products and therefore patterned by the conditions of its creations and use. The dissertation have three objectives; to discuss the sport and media sectors, to investigate the relationship between the two, and finally to apply the theoretical framework to this relationship. Qualitative method and unstructured interviews, with a sample size of 12, were used as means a meeting these objectives. The first part of the dissertation was based on bibliographical contributions, the latter part on empirical findings. Applying determinism to the relationship between media and sport would imply that one of the agents have inevitable ‘effects’ or ‘impacts’ on the other. More specifically, changes in the media industry/technology will bring about changes in the sports sector, and the sports federations have no other choice than react to these changes. The social shaping of technology approach sees media technologies as entering social settings that are home to often deeply ingrained habits and cultural practices that shape the media. From this point of view the relationship between media and sport is characterised by negotiation and interpretation. The agents cooperate, and thus, mutually benefit of being in the relationship. Chapter 5 presented the interviewees opinions in five areas. Concepts like communication, cooperation and mutual benefit can summarize the findings. For example, the president of the IBU, the sport controller of the EBU and the owner of APF marketing are all of the opinion that the recent technological developments have been mutual beneficial for all parties involved. The media sector does not dictate how the further development of the biathlon sport should be, neither has the media done so in the past, but it offers opportunities. It is the leadership of the sport who decides which opportunities to take, and which to pass. The empirical findings and the bibliographical analysis do not support the idea of determinism. The new media technologies have offered opportunities, however, they do not have inevitable consequences. The sport federations own the broadcasting right and can sell them to whomever they want. The media and sport environment is characterised by cooperation and mutual benefit, concepts that support the validity of the social shaping of technology approach. In some instances media benefit more than the sports, others times it is the other way around.nor
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectSociology Theoretical Qualitative Regional ICT Media Multimedia Sporten_US
dc.titleSport and media in the "Information Society" : mutual interdependence or power relation?en_US
dc.typeMaster thesisen_US
dc.date.updated2013-11-08en_US
dc.creator.authorBesseberg, Trineen_US
dc.subject.nsiVDP::200en_US
dc.identifier.bibliographiccitationinfo:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&rft.au=Besseberg, Trine&rft.title=Sport and media in the "Information Society"&rft.inst=University of Oslo&rft.date=2000&rft.degree=Masteroppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-3698en_US
dc.type.documentMasteroppgaveen_US
dc.identifier.duo6022en_US
dc.identifier.bibsys02230827xen_US
dc.identifier.fulltextFulltext https://www.duo.uio.no/bitstream/handle/10852/17817/1/besseberg.pdf


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